‘The devil’s agent’ Scott Boras is a text message sent to Steve Cohen, owner of the New York Mets, when Carlos Correa and the San Francisco Giants’ 13-year, $350 million contract was suspended during the medical test phase. It was San Francisco that hesitated to sign a contract after watching Correa’s medical test results, and the contract was about to break. The owner of Cohen, who was on vacation in Hawaii, spearheaded the recruitment of Correa through a text message from Boras. In the end, Correa took a sharp turn from west to east and agreed to a 12-year, $315 million deal with the New York Mets. There’s already an All-Star shortstop in the name of Francisco Lindor, but Cohen was serious about filling the “superstar.” Correa also agreed to play at third base without hurting Lindor’s ego. 

But again, Correa’s contract is stopped at the physical examination stage. Like San Francisco, the Mets judged Correa’s physical condition to be risky for an ultra-long-term contract. In 2014, while in the minor leagues, he underwent arthroscopic surgery for a fracture of his right fibula and ligament damage, which the Mets took issue with. It was said that it would be a Christmas present for Cohen and Mets, but the timing is getting late to say that it is a New Year’s gift. 

Even so, it was a situation where the Mets were highly likely. ‘The Athletic’ reporter Ken Rosenthal said, “The final contract is guaranteed to be $315 million, 토토사이트 but it won’t be 12 years. The problem is how the terms change and how the contract changes. There is no indication that the Mets want to walk away from the contract.”

“If you were Correa and your agent Scott Boras, you wouldn’t want that kind of clause. Because it devalues ​​contracts and creates uncertainty.” 

Boras protests that there is nothing wrong with Corea’s physical condition. And he didn’t want to amend the terms of the contract either. He stubbornly continued to negotiate with the Mets. However, since the contract already exceeded the luxury tax limit, even if the owner had the will, the working-level team had no choice but to approach cautiously. The club wants to include injury and ‘safety’ clauses, but Correa and Boras don’t want them. 

However, Corea and Boras seem to be moving again. The ‘New York Post’ explained that ‘Correa is in contact with other teams again two weeks after contract negotiations with the Mets stopped’, and that the Minnesota Twins, who were rejected once, were included. Minnesota acquired Correa last year for three years and $105.3 million. Correa applied for opt-out after one year and entered the free agent market, but Minnesota also offered a 10-year, $285 million contract. 

These are Corea and Boras, who entered the market with enthusiasm and guaranteed large-scale contracts. However, he is losing face by not finalizing the contract for nearly a month. It’s a fact that everyone acknowledges that Correa is an all-star player and deserves a big contract. However, the physical condition they were confident in shows that in the end, it is a level that is difficult for any club to readily accept. 

Now Boras must find the trick. He must maximize his customer value. Will Boras be able to find a trick to finish the Corea contract issue?